20 Types of Air Plants That Will Brighten Your Home with Barely Any Work

20 Types of Air Plants That Will Brighten Your Home with Barely Any Work

Did you know that there are hundreds of types of air plants? These low-maintenance plants, which are from the Tillandsia genus, don’t require any soil to grow, making them a fun option for decorating your home.

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Tillandsia Xerographica

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Tillandsia Xerographica

One of the best-known air plants, the Tillandsia xerographica is often called the “King of Air Plants” due to its massive size. This oversized air plant has light green flocked leaves that curl toward the tips, and it can grow to by up to 3 feet across in proper conditions—talk about a statement piece!

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Tillandsia Velutina Ecomm Via Livelyroot.com

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Tillandsia Velutina

You can add some color to your home with Tillandsia velutina, a classic air plant that changes color when it’s about to bloom. If you keep this air plant happy and give it plenty of light, the leaves will begin to turn a lovely shade of red.

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Tillandsia Tectorum

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Tillandsia Tectorum

All air plants are cool, but the Tillandsia tectorum is definitely one of our favorites. This variety is easy to recognize thanks to its light green, fuzzy leaves and rounded shape, which earned it the nickname the “Snowball Air Plant.”

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Tillandsia Cacticola

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Tillandsia Cacticola

How cute is this rare air plant? The Tillandsia cacticola is one of the few air plants that grow along a stem, and while you may think its name is a reference to its cactus-like shape, it’s actually because the variety grows on cacti in northern Peru, where it’s native.

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Tillandsia Usneoides

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Tillandsia Usneoides

While this plant’s scientific name is Tillandsia usneoides, you probably know it as Spanish moss. It’s often seen hanging down from trees in tropical climates, and it will make a lovely addition to your decor, as its many strands drape beautifully.

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Tillandsia Cyanea Ecomm Via Heyhorti.com

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Tillandsia Cyanea

Also known as a Pink Quill air plant, the Tillandsia cyanea is unique because it can actually be grown in a pot with soil, giving you a chance to put your favorite indoor plant pots to good use. This air plant is known for its long-lasting pink flowers, which resemble the shape of a feather—hence, its nickname.

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Tillandsia Ionantha 'druid'

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Tillandsia Ionantha ‘Druid’

Here’s another color-changing air plant to add a vibrant pop to your decor. The Tillandsia ionantha ‘Druid’—say that five times fast!—blushes a bright yellow before it blooms, and it puts out delicate white flowers in the right conditions.

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Tillandsia 'silver Queen

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Tillandsia ‘Silver Queen’

The Tillandsia ‘Silver Queen’ is every bit as regal as her name suggests. This popular variety of air plant has a silvery fuzz on its leaves, and when given proper care (which includes weekly watering), it can grow quite large—though not quite as big as the Tillandsia xerographica.

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Tillandsia Fasciculata 'tropiflora'

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Tillandsia Fasciculata ‘Tropiflora’

Many air plants are quite small, measuring just a few inches, but if you’re looking for something that will command attention in any room, the Tillandsia fasciculata ‘Tropiflora’ is the way to go. This giant air plant can grow up to 18 inches tall, and it puts out brightly colored tropical blooms.

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Tillandsia Funckiana

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Tillandsia Funckiana

It might look like a stem from a pine tree, but we assure you Tillandsia funckiana is an air plant—and a cute one, at that! It will twist and turn as it grows, and the tips of its leaves turn bright red before it blooms.

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Tillandsia Kautskyi

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Tillandsia Kautskyi

This teeny, tiny air plant is actually a rare find. With an appearance similar to a succulent, Tillandsia kautskyi has a tight, compact form and maxes out at around 4 inches tall. If you can get the little plant to bloom, its flower is vibrant in color and almost as large as the plant itself!

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Tillandsia Streptophylla

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Tillandsia Streptophylla

The Tillandsia streptophylla has the nickname “Shirley Temple” due to its curly leaves. This variety of air plant is a great choice if you live in a low-humidity climate—the drier the conditions, the more its leaves will twist!

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Tillandsia Andreana

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Tillandsia Andreana

No, it’s not a sea urchin—it’s the Tillandsia andreana air plant! This cute little plant features thin, spiky leaves, which makes it fairly sensitive to environmental changes. You’ll want to keep it in a room with a stable temperature.

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Tillandsia Butzii

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Tillandsia Butzii

If you’re looking for an air plant that will hang down off your decor, Tillandsia Butzii is the way to go. It has a bulbous base with long, trailing leaves, and it can grow to be up to 10 inches long.

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Tillandsia Latifolia

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Tillandsia Latifolia

Tillandsia latifolia is one of the bigger air plants you’ll run into, and it can grow to be more than 20 inches tall. Just pop it in a vase or air plant holder, and you’ve got yourself a lovely piece of living decor.

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Tillandsia Pruinosa

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Tillandsia Pruinosa

While it has similar leaves to a Medusa’s head air plant, the Tillandsia pruinosa stands out in a few ways. Its leaves are more flexible, and the trichomes—those little fuzzy strands—on the surface of the plant are longer, giving it almost a velvety appearance.

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Tillandsia Juncea

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Tillandsia Juncea

This particular variety of air plant actually looks like grass! The Tillandsia juncea has straight leaves that grow upward in a clump, and they can grow to be around 10 inches tall. They’re sure to look cute displayed in a bud vase or incorporated into a terrarium.

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Tillandsia Stricta

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Tillandsia Stricta

The Tillandsia stricta goes by the nickname “Cousin Itt” thanks to its thin leaves, which drape down around its base like hair. It’s a fairly uncommon air plant variety, so you’ll likely have better luck buying plants online than at a local nursery.

Originally Published: September 13, 2023

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